Resources

The influence of television suicide in a normal adolescent population

This cross-sectional study investigated the possible impact of exposure to television suicide on normal adolescents. Students (mean age 14.2 years) from 3 high schools completed a questionnaire on television habits, common television life events, the Youth Self-Report Scale, the Brief Adolescent Risk-Taking Scale and a brief Substance Use Scale.

Students claiming more than two exposures to television suicide took more risks and substances, watched more videos, denied being upset by television, had a history of suicide attempt, knew more of suicide in the community, and had higher depression scores.

Download Here: Television Suicide

Martin, G., 1996. The Influence of Television Suicide in a Normal Adolescent Population. Archives of Suicide Research, 2:2, 103-117.

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Gender differences in the relationship between depression and suicidal ideation in young adolescents

This paper is based on over 2400 adolescents aged 13 from 27 schools. It demonstrates differences between young men and young women in levels of depression, responses to it, and suicidality

Download here: *Gender differences in the relationship between depression and suicidal ideation in young adolescents 2001

Allison, S., Roeger, L., Martin, G., & Keeves, J., 2001. Gender Differences in the relationship between depression and suicidal ideation in young adolescents. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 35, 498-503

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Adolescent Suicide, Depression and Family Dysfunction

This paper investigated high school students’ perceptions of their family dynamics and correlated this to levels of depression, suicidal thinking and a history of attempts.

 

Download here  *Adolescent suicide, depression & family dysfunction

 

Martin, G., Rozanes, P., Allison, S. & Pearce, C., 1995. Adolescent Suicide, Depression and Family Dysfunction. Acta Psych. Scand., 92:336-344.
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